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A Good Under $750 Gaming Computer Build 2016

$750 is the perfect price range for building a gaming computer that can play most modern games on high settings.
$750 is the perfect price range for building a gaming computer that can play most modern games on high settings.

Build a Gaming PC for Max FPS on a $750 Budget

With a $750 gaming desktop you want to get the max FPS you can for your build while still retaining the quality of your machine. Here I'll give you the need-to-know information about building the best under $750 PC gaming desktop and get a good idea of some alternate options for those of you who'd rather go for more performance or perhaps functionality.

As we just finished our $600 gaming PC build as well as our $500 rig I thought it'd be nice to jump up to a build that gives us a little more wiggle room when it comes to components. At the $750 price range we should be able to put together a build that not only will allows us to play graphically intense games like Battlefield 1, but also do it at an FPS that keeps us competitive.

60 FPS Good Enough? Not for Many Gamers.

I see a lot of sites talking about how you want to get your game to an FPS of 60 to play. Ultimately, my personal opinion is the more FPS the better. I try to aim above 100 when it comes to shooters or RTS games and if I can't on high resolution settings I usually will sacrifice a bit of eye candy in order to get what I feel is a bigger competitive advantage.

*To get the most performance out of your build, allocate just about 60% of your overall budget to our CPU and Graphics card.

The i5-6600k is a temptation here, but is it worth the cost?
The i5-6600k is a temptation here, but is it worth the cost?

A Good Processor for Gaming Around $200

For this build we're going for the Skylake i5-6500. If you're an overclocker, you might want to consider the i6-6600k here; however, you'll need to spend at least $80 more between a Z170 motherboard, CPU cooler, and the CPU itself and that's when using some of the cheapest parts that are available.

Is Overclocking Worth it Here?

If we're strictly speaking about Max FPS that same amount of money could allow us to get closer to a higher-end GPU. Ultimately, unless it's something you have to have, overclocking could cost more than it's worth at this price point and more importantly could cost you frames. I'm not saying don't overclock, I'm just speaking from a strict value perspective.

The GTX 1060 gets my pick as the best performer in the $250 price range. Go with the RX 480 if you plan on doing a dual card configuration at some point.
The GTX 1060 gets my pick as the best performer in the $250 price range. Go with the RX 480 if you plan on doing a dual card configuration at some point.

Choosing a Good Under $250 PC Gaming Graphics Card in 2016

GTX 1060 6GB vs RX 480 8GB vs GTX 970

If you're looking in this price range, then most likely you're going for one of these three graphics cards. Without getting into too much detail, the GTX 1060 6GB is the better performer overall in DirectX11 games and similar in DirectX 12 games. That being said you can't use an SLI configuration of the 1060 and the RX 480 has similar performance.

For a good value purchase you could also consider a used GTX 970. I've seen them for as low as $180 used and it is very similar in performance to the RX 480 and GTX 1060.

For more thoughts, here's a good discussion of the best graphics cards under $200.

Gigabyte's H170 chipset Gaming 3 Skylake motherboard is cheap and has a ton of good features. This includes Killer E2200 Gaming Networks and 2-way graphics support.
Gigabyte's H170 chipset Gaming 3 Skylake motherboard is cheap and has a ton of good features. This includes Killer E2200 Gaming Networks and 2-way graphics support.

A Good Skylake Motherboard Under $100

While a Z97 motherboard would be ideal here for overclockers, we're going to go with a solid board in the Gigabyte GA-H170-Gaming Motherboard. If you'd rather go with the Z170 chipset, you'll need to set aside some additional cash for a standard ATX board.

Gigabyte has tried to emphasize some of its higher-end on its lower motherboards and it really shows in these budget boards.

Keep in mind that with any chipset other than the Z170 you'll get DDR4 2133MHz compatibility only. So, go with whatever kit you can find that's reliable and cheap.

My Most Recent $750 to $800 Build on YouTube

Getting a Good Power Supply Pays Off

While i don't really like to spend more money than is necessary on components that will have a minimal impact on gaming performance, I think it's that you go with a power supply that will last you a long time.

A tier 1 power supply in the EVGA SuperNova will keep your expensive components safe and be useful in future builds to come. In addition, it'll be more power efficient as well.

How Much Power Do You Need?

Speaking of power, this build shouldn't use more than 300 Watts. Over the past few years power requirements for computers continue to decline. I see this as a good thing. So, ultimately even if you plan on expanding you're not going to need a huge power supply.

Even with these lower requirements we're going with a 550W power supply. This is mainly because it's one of the better quality and cheaper gold rated power supplies available. It'll also gives you just about the right room for expansion. For the 550W model you'll pay between $70 and $90 so look for sales and rebates.

If you want to go cheap here, try your hand at EVGA's 430W Bronze Certified Power supply. I've been able to find them as low as $25 after rebate recently. I use these power supplies regularly on budget builds. They aren't as good of quality, but ultimately they should do the job for a few years.

Under $50 Mid Tower Gaming Cases

As I mentioned in the previous post there's really only two cases that I'd consider at this price point. The Rosewill Challenger U3 for those of you who want in inexpensive case with 3 pre-installed fans or the Cooler Master Elite 430 for a solid case with lots of expansion options and a windowed side panel.


If you're willing to spend a little bit more, then you could consider upgrading to the Cooler Master Haf 912, Storm Enforcer, or NZXT Guardian here as well. You can find more case options in my post on the best mid tower gaming cases.

Corsair Vengeance Ram
Corsair Vengeance Ram

Other Hardware and Final Impression

8GB of Gaming Ram under $40

For ram I'm recommending you go with Kingston's HyperX Fury 2133MHz 2x4GB kit. It's from a reliable manufacturer, doesn't cost a lot, and works perfectly with our build.

Solid State Drive or Hard Drive

You could get a 2TB Hitachi Deskstar Hard drive for this build or a 240GB solid state drive. Both cost around $60. I'll leave the decision up to you; however, I personally wouldn't build any gaming rig in 2016 without a solid state drive. It's just too much speed to pass up.

For additional capacity, consider moving an older hard drive or using an external drive for excess files.

Final Thoughts:

Ultimately you want to build a gaming PC that not only plays the latest games but also has long-term sustainability and the functionality you need in a PC. I feel like we've achieved that with this build but would love to hear your thoughts and questions on the matter. Please feel free to use the comment section below as an open forum for discussion.

© 2013 Brandon Hart

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$750 PC Gaming Desktop Build Discussion 2 comments

Viewer 2 years ago

If you add all the items you have mentioned; it is over $750.. very misleading :(


Chris 2 years ago

Most informative post I found so far, really helped me decide on what parts I need more than which ones I want

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