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5 Reasons Why You Should Play "World of Warcraft: Legion"

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Geek, gamer, writer, graphic artist. Ced's favorite shows and adventures are those that allow him to enjoy the world from his bedroom.

"World of Warcraft: Legion" is an expansion for Blizzard's epic MMORPG.

"World of Warcraft: Legion" is an expansion for Blizzard's epic MMORPG.

5 Great Features of World of Warcraft: Legion

  1. Artifact Trait Trees
  2. Class Halls
  3. A Revitalisation of Player vs. Player
  4. Cultural References
  5. The Wardrobe
The Ashbringer artifact upgrade "tree."

The Ashbringer artifact upgrade "tree."

The trait tree for my arcane mage artifact. Notice how different it is from that of Ashbringer's.

The trait tree for my arcane mage artifact. Notice how different it is from that of Ashbringer's.

1. Artifact Trait Trees

There’s something about talent trees that is just so mesmerizing. Especially the non-linear ones.

Do you go left or right? Which is the easiest route, or the most rewarding one? OMG! Does this prescribed route truly suit my style of gameplay?

Blizzard understands the lure of such trees, and so they built their main selling point for Legion around it. Each player now gets up to three artifacts, or legendary weapons, each of which comes with unique traits and a different powering up system.

Through the collection of relics, you then decide how and when to power up your weapon. To give even more depth to the system, each trait has different levels of empowerment too. An additional “gemming” function furthermore allows you to work different routes simultaneously, aiming for the quickest way for these routes to meet.

It’s giddying just to listen to, isn’t it? And a progression that’s hands-down way superior to grinding for tens of badges and emblems in raids and dailies just to get that one piece of legendary gear. One that comes with a standard, boring enhancement.

To highlight, throughout the lifespan of the Legion expansion, there were hundreds of forum threads heatedly discussing all possible routes for artifact powering up.

The Mage Class Hall in "World of Warcraft: Legion."

The Mage Class Hall in "World of Warcraft: Legion."

2. Class Halls

The Garrison concept in Warlords of Draenor was a bold move. Problem was, it was poorly executed, and it quickly became a tiresome chore.

Take, for example, follower missions. After all the effort involved with recruiting, leveling, and gearing followers, they became redundant before the first major patch hit. Successful missions then barely reward rare resources. Heck, even the occasional gear given is nothing compared to just walking out of the garrison and killing something with a silver dragon tag.

Legion addresses these fails by introducing the streamlined Class Hall concept. Gone are all the pointless, confusing, and tedious profession chores. Whatever you do here has a direct, useful impact on your class.

Followers, renamed as Champions, actively assist with leveling up the player or hunting for gear enhancement. There’s also an upgrade tree to fuss over, one that yields practical gaming advantages instead of cosmetic enhancements. Oh, have I mentioned there are Class Hall armor sets too?

A Superior Concept That Takes Time to Sink In

Truth be told, though, after all the chores involved with maintaining the Draenor Garrison, the Class Hall initially felt a little underwhelming. So . . . very few things to do, if you know what I mean.

It was only after a few hours of playing that I understood the superiority of the concept. By removing professions from the equation, far more detailed and meaningful progressions could be introduced for a player’s chosen crafts. You also do not have to waste gaming time micromanaging tasks that are ultimately unproductive. All in all, a winning concept. One which I excitedly await the next enhancements for.

The PvP talent system added in "World of Warcraft: Legion."

The PvP talent system added in "World of Warcraft: Legion."

3. A Revitalisation of Player vs. Player

Blizzard always insisted on separating Player-Versus-Player (PvP) and Player-Versus-Environment (PvE). Their justification has always been that someone who geared up by devoting hours to whacking other players shouldn’t get to enjoy end-game story content right away with their awarded gear.

In support of their stance, they introduced dramatic amendments to the PvP system with each expansion, changes frequently in the form of simplifications or confusing gear concepts. Over time, these moves somewhat drove the shine out of PvP. With Legion, Blizzard then executes its most dramatic PvP change yet by introducing the brand new Honor System.

Players at level cap now earn Honor not to buy gear, but to build up a fresh set of talents. These talents benefit PvP gameplay exclusively.

There is also a devoted talent tree. One that works differently from the traditional one. Along the way, you get opportunities to earn loot or gold too.

On top of which, there is little reason to stop PvPing after finishing the Honor System. You could reset it in exchange for a Prestige rank. Prestige ranks reward cosmetic enhancements and even mounts.

Lastly, or should I say most important, PvP gear is trashed! (For the time being) Gone is the age-old question of whether PvP gear should be good enough for raiding. Gone too is the need to build up two sets of gear. What you wear is good enough for anything. How well you perform, though, depends on how hard you have worked on building those Honor talents.

In my opinion, these drastic changes resolve all sorts of needless arguments over the years. It also moves towards PvP and PvE finally achieving long-due cohesion and balance. Such a revamp should have come earlier.

As a frost mage, I've long dreamed of being Elsa ...

As a frost mage, I've long dreamed of being Elsa ...

4. Cultural References

World of Warcraft has always been heavy with pop culture references. With Legion, Blizzard “lets it go” and pumps up these references to fill every corner.

I mean, as in literally. An upgrade trait for my frost mage artifact is named Let It Go. Another trait is called Ice Age. On my fire mage artifact, it is imperative to earn the Great Balls of Fire trait.

And then you have achievements with names like Azsuna Matata and Ain't No Mountain High Enough. There is a reference to Hogwarts in a quest chain too.

Admittedly, appreciating these references is somewhat of an acquired taste. Some players might even find them corny. If you have been WoWing for a while, however, chances are you would look forward to encountering them.

The fun in noticing them aside, many could also be educational. To give an example, a few years back, I finally got down to reading Hemingway. It was completely because of all those quest titles derived from the names of his stories.

The Wardrobe panel in "Legion."

The Wardrobe panel in "Legion."

5. The Wardrobe

Bags used to sell really well in the World of Warcraft. Everybody needed more slots to store their obsolete gear for transmogrification. There was also the need to store all sorts of reagents, rare drops, etc.

But bags were never, ever enough since you could only have a limited few. To resolve the problem, Blizzard then introduced void storage, the toy box, and the reagent bank tab. With Legion, they complete this “expansion” in space by introducing the Wardrobe.

That’s right. A dedicated interface just for transmogrification. Every appearance you have accumulated, including those before Legion, is added the moment you launch the expansion. The moment you soulbound anything, that appearance is added too.

Better yet, you don’t forfeit any appearance just because you chose the other quest reward. Regardless of your choice at the end of a quest, the appearances of all possible gear rewards are added.

How does that sound? Enough to get you storming all those retro dungeons and raids just to collect more looks? Did I also mention that there are achievements tagged to the Wardrobe, with the meta one rewarding the title of the Fabulous?

Imagine yourself standing in downtown Stormwind or Orgrimmar, donning your coolest or weirdest gear. With that title.

[Your Name Here] the Fabulous

How cool is that?

© 2016 Ced Yong

Comments

Ced Yong (author) from Asia on November 18, 2016:

Hey Cheeky! I'm sorry to hear that. WoW is one of the best value-for-money games about, with so much things to enjoy from it. I hope one day you get to play it.

Then again, maybe it's best that you don't. It's long established that WoW is terribly addictive and takes away your time from everything else. You wouldn't have time for Anime once you've started! :P

Cheeky Kid from Milky Way on November 17, 2016:

Have always wanted to play this. Unfortunately, internet here is clunky and inconsistent so I can't really play it as smooth as possible.