9 Reasons Why You Should Play Sega’s "Yakuza" Series

Updated on February 18, 2020
CYong74 profile image

Geek, gamer, writer, graphic artist. The Geek's favorite movies and games are those that allow him to enjoy the world from his bedroom.

There are so many reasons why you should play Sega’s Yakuza series.
There are so many reasons why you should play Sega’s Yakuza series.

Some gamers continue to debate which genre Sega’s Yakuza Series belongs to. Is it an arcade brawler, an open-world survival quest, or a modern-day JRPG?

In my opinion, no one would ever have the right answer because each Yakuza game is such an astonishing mix of gameplay, storytelling, and adventure. Here are 9 reasons why you should immerse yourself in this highly popular Japanese gangland series. As it's been a Sega PlayStation exclusive series for over ten years, I’d go as far as to say it might be worth buying a PlayStation just to experience the Yakuza games.

The Japanese name for the "Yakuza" series is "Ryu ga Gotoku" (龍が如く). This means "like a dragon."

1. Incredibly Realistic World Design

First of all, know that the Yakuza series isn’t a true open-world game series. While there are large spreads of areas to explore, these pale in comparison to “real” open-world games like Skyrim or Far Cry. Usually, it doesn’t require more than a minute to travel from one end of the game area to the other.

That said, each episode in the Yakuza series is renowned for realistic world design. The recurring area of Kamurocho is based on Tokyo’s infamous Kabukicho red light district, and anyone who has been to Kabukicho will immediately notice how closely Sega’s virtual rendition resembles the real district.

To further heighten realism, Sega also partnered actual Japanese companies like Don Quijote and Yoronotaki, and included their outlets in the games. Even if you’re not into gangland adventures, you can still enjoy the series just by strolling through the astonishing virtual streets—it’s akin to a cyber visit to Japan. For anyone curious about enjoying the world from your sofa i.e., virtual tourism, the Yakuza games definitely contain some of the best titles to play.

Kamurocho is based on Tokyo's notorious Kabukicho red light district.
Kamurocho is based on Tokyo's notorious Kabukicho red light district.
"Yakuza 6: The Song of Life" convenience store. Meticulously designed to resemble actual Japanese "konbini" stores.
"Yakuza 6: The Song of Life" convenience store. Meticulously designed to resemble actual Japanese "konbini" stores.

2. Intricate Battle Systems

Physical combat features heavily in each Yakuza game. If you’re not into brawling action, though, worry not. Other than fighting, there are plenty of other things to do. The extensive customization features in each episode also ensure anyone can enjoy a unique experience, no matter their level of skill.

Admittedly, such customization features could have a downside, as in it could result in combat being too confusing. For example, Yakuza 0 features 8 systems of battle, all of which are interchangeable during combat. Fortunately, the games are typically forgiving enough that you can still get through them without memorizing complicated combos. For the PS4 episodes, there’s also the option to switch to easy mode should you lose a fight twice. A very convenient feature, in the case of clumsy players like me.

“Yakuza 0” combat. The battle systems in all episodes are flexible enough to cater to most players.
“Yakuza 0” combat. The battle systems in all episodes are flexible enough to cater to most players.

3. Outstanding Storytelling and Voice Acting

Like any good gangster movie, every Yakuza game is full of twists and turns, betrayals and surprises. What’s more noteworthy, though, is the superb voice acting. Protagonist Kiryu Kazuma is voiced by Takaya Kuroda, an established voice actor renowned for his astringent, expressive voice. So beloved is Kuroda’s voice acting, it could be said his/Kiryu’s voice is an indispensable part of the Yakuza experience. For me, it was what made Kiryu-san so memorable, so human too.

On top of which, in Yakuza 6, you get to enjoy more than just Kuroda’s voice. For this epilogue, Sega splurged and recruited three leading Japanese actors, these being Beat Takeshi (Zatoichi/Ghost in the Shell), Tatsuya Fujiwara (Death Note/Kaiji), and Shun Oguri (Boys Over Flowers/Lupin III/Gintama). Not only do they voice important supporting characters, even their physical likeness are captured for the game. In every way, playing Yakuza 6 is akin to watching a full-length Japanese gangster show. One that features an ensemble of the most popular Japanese male leads nowadays.

Takaya Kuroda's splendid voice acting contributed much to the popularity of protagonist Kiryu Kazuma.
Takaya Kuroda's splendid voice acting contributed much to the popularity of protagonist Kiryu Kazuma.

4. Great Music

A key attraction of the Yakuza series is the many mini-games found in each episode. Among these, Karaoke has consistently been a player’s favorite. Many players also love this mini-game not so much for the gameplay but for the wonderful tracks featured through it.

Tracks which are never hastily composed, haphazardly sung game jingles. A good many Yakuza karaoke songs are incredibly catchy and melodic, possibly what you might remember longest after completing the games. For a taste of these compositions, simply do a search in YouTube for "Yakuza Karaoke Songs." Let me add that many of these songs are extremely Japanese in feel too. They greatly, greatly add to the oriental ambiance of each adventure.

5. Socio-Political Commentary on Japan

Every Yakuza game contains tens of side quests known as substories. Varying greatly in length and feel, some of these are rather talky, leading to some players disliking them overall.

I feel otherwise. A lot of these Yakuza substories reference real-life situations in modern Japan, phenomena such as scams, cults, and inexplicable urban culture. Playing through them, therefore, heightens the realism of the games. The experience also offers deep insight into modern Japanese life.

At the same time, there’s always an equal mix of quirky, poignant, insightful, and humorous stories, which means every player is bound to find something likable. Lastly, the sheer amount of substories throughout the Yakuza series ensures game playability lasts long beyond the end of the main story. Let me add too that some of these stories are so different in feel to the main quest, it’s like playing another game altogether.

Over time, the Yakuza game series explored many social topics of Japan. For example, the unforgiving career demands endured by so-called "idols."
Over time, the Yakuza game series explored many social topics of Japan. For example, the unforgiving career demands endured by so-called "idols."

6. You Can Enjoy Classic Sega Games

Sega has long been an established name in the gaming world. Before the arrival of the PlayStation and Xbox, it was Nintendo’s top rival. It was also a major manufacturer of arcade consoles, fondly remembered by many gamers for its elaborate, unforgettable racing games.

The Yakuza game series features many classic Sega titles as mini-games. Full fledge ones too. Lived for years with regret because you never made it past the third stage of OutRun at your neighborhood arcade? Reminiscent of those long-gone days when you lingered at your buddy’s place just to play Fantasy Zone? Well, you can re-experience many of these retro classics within the virtual arcades of this series. Be warned in advance, though, that many Yakuza players have reportedly spent more time on these mini-games than on the main story. Simplicity and nostalgia can often be utterly addictive.

Remember seeing this in arcades 20 years ago? A full version of OutRun is available in "Yakuza 0."
Remember seeing this in arcades 20 years ago? A full version of OutRun is available in "Yakuza 0."

7. You Can Learn About Classic Japanese Card Games

While it has never been explicitly stated, the Yakuza game series is big on showcasing Japanese culture and entertainment. Many mini-games in the series are based on pastimes beloved by actual Japanese people, pastimes such as karaoke, pub/club chatting, shoji, and mah-jong. In addition, episodes like Yakuza 0 and Yakuza Ishin also feature classic Japanese card games such as Koi-Koi and Oicho Kabu. Don’t you agree the names of these card games are utterly exotic just to listen to? Wait till you see the cards they are played with. Like me, you might end up scouring the Internet to order a set from Japan.

The very Japanese card game of Koi-Koi. I've never heard of this until I played "Yakuza Ishin."
The very Japanese card game of Koi-Koi. I've never heard of this until I played "Yakuza Ishin."

8. It’s a Great Way to Improve Your Japanese

Naturally, any Japanese video game with good subtitles is invaluable to someone learning the Japanese language, whether for travel, work, or social purposes. However, I feel Yakuza titles are doubly valuable because the lead, Kiryu Kazuma, always speaks so clearly and stoically. Unlike what you might encounter in many Anime or Japanese drama series, Kiryu-san rarely screams or shrieks, and even when he does, he still enunciates every word clearly. As someone learning Japanese, I’ll share that I’ve long started to model my pronunciation after him. Kiryu-san is also my current favorite point of reference for Japanese slang words.

“Yakuza 6” karaoke mini-game.
“Yakuza 6” karaoke mini-game.

9. Attractive Japanese Women Are Part and Parcel of the Yakuza Series

There. I said it. Now let me qualify this rather sexist statement.

Hostesses bars, sexy chats, the likes of, feature prominently in all Yakuza games. Also, as rewards for substories, you sometimes get to view . . . interesting videos.

None of these get too steamy though, all are relatively child-safe and with some individual storylines even emotionally poignant. What’s eye-opening at the same time is that practically all of these encounters depict the dominance of CONVERSATION in the Japanese red-light industry. Yup. It’s crystal clear always that the hostesses you meet do not provide physical services; they only sell companionship. Again, it’s another curious insight into the Japanese world. One that is endlessly fascinating. Probably very entertaining too for the indoctrinated and familiar.

A “Yakuza 6” hostess. Chatting with attractive hostesses is a key part of every Yakuza game.
A “Yakuza 6” hostess. Chatting with attractive hostesses is a key part of every Yakuza game.

© 2017 ScribblingGeek

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    • CYong74 profile imageAUTHOR

      ScribblingGeek 

      15 months ago from Singapore

      Agreed!

    • profile image

      Leo 

      15 months ago

      10. Majima

    • CYong74 profile imageAUTHOR

      ScribblingGeek 

      20 months ago from Singapore

      :) I've already done a couple over at my blog at scribblinggeek.com

      Next week, I'd be adding another 4. These would be from my recent trip.

    • poppyr profile image

      Poppy 

      20 months ago from Enoshima, Japan

      Maybe you could write an article about places to visit in Tokyo/Osaka from the games :) that would be popular I think.

    • CYong74 profile imageAUTHOR

      ScribblingGeek 

      20 months ago from Singapore

      Hi Poppy, thanks for commenting! It's great and very heartwarming to know you are so supportive of your husband's passion. And yes, the story for Majima in Episode 0 was truly heartbreaking. Adds a whole new depth to the mad dog persona, doesn't it?

      As for the overall franchise, I think they are great for tourism too! I recently spent several days of my latest Japan trip visiting Yakuza locations like Kabukicho and Onomichi, and dining at the restaurants featured in the games. Paired with music from the series, the experience was absolutely unreal. I simply couldn't stop grinning throughout!

    • poppyr profile image

      Poppy 

      20 months ago from Enoshima, Japan

      My husband loves these games. I always buy him the latest one for Christmas. He always finishes them within a couple of weeks.

      It's actually nostalgic for me now to have watched him play Yakuza 0, wooing girls as Kiryu and playing the hostess bar minigame (I've heard they removed that in the American version but I'm not sure if that's true.)

      I absolutely love Majima! And even though I didn't play the game myself, the ending made me cry. It's a great game series and I'm glad my husband likes them because aside from Resident Evil Revelations 2, there aren't any other games he plays.

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