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“WSOP” Crown Roulette Guide

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The “WSOP” Crown Roulette table.

The “WSOP” Crown Roulette table.

About WSOP Crown Roulette

Crown Roulette is a game mode in the popular online poker game WSOP.

In this guide, I am going to give you an easy strategy to win chips playing this game mode.

Table of Contents

What Is Crown Roulette?

Crown Roulette is a combination of two WSOP event game modes. Texas Roulette and Crown Hold ‘em.

In Crown Roulette, you play mostly with Broadway cards. These are the cards needed to make the best straight possible.

You also can play with the nine card. So you play with the cards 9, T, J, Q, K, and A.

You can only call or fold preflop. You also can only fold or go all-in on the flop. This is a game mode of very simple decisions.

These are the broadway poker cards.

These are the broadway poker cards.

Crown Roulette Preflop Guide

I play most hands preflop. I tend to be pickier on the blinds as I don’t like playing out of position postflop.

I also tend to avoid playing hands with a nine in them. Those hands are going to be weaker postflop most of the time.

I do call these hands on the button, though.

wsop-crown-roulette-guide

Crown Roulette Postflop Strategy

The following hands are what you want to play in Crown Roulette. Stick to these hands and you will win as often as possible.

I organized the hands from the weakest to the strongest hands.

The Crown Roulette stakes selection screen.

The Crown Roulette stakes selection screen.

Single Pairs

Pairs are losing hands. Don't ever go all-in with anything but two pair or stronger.

This is a single pair hand.

This is a single pair hand.

Flush Draws

With so few cards in the deck, the odds of making a flush are somewhat better. But this still is a very weak hand.

Going all-in on the flop with a straight flush draw is going to be a losing play long-term. The times you make it will not cover the times you lose.

If another player has one of the cards you need to make a straight flush, you will never make it.

There are some situations where I might go all-in with a flush draw.

I will call if somebody with a pitifully small stack goes all-in and this a heads up game.

For example, somebody goes all-in for 12 blinds. I might call to see if I make it for the fun of it at that point.

Straights

Straights are a losing hand in Crown Roulette.

Pairs and three of a kind will improve to a full house a good amount of the time. A straight will never get better.

Sometimes you might win anyway. But the odds are not worth it long-term.

You will often lose straights this way if you play them.

You will often lose straights this way if you play them.

Two Pair

Two pair is always a more speculative hand. I sometimes go all-in with this hand, but I try to avoid it.

This is two pair.

This is two pair.

Trips

Trips tend to be a good hand to go all with. I am still somewhat more cautious with this hand, though.

This is trips.

This is trips.

Sets

You might think that a set is the same as trips. They are both three of a kind hands, right?

A set is going to be stronger than trips most of the time. This is why I go all-in with almost every set I make in Crown Roulette.

This is a set.

This is a set.

Flushes

This is the confusing hand. Since there is the nine card, it is possible to make a plain flush.

I am uncertain about this hand. I think it is a fold still because if the board pairs, you probably lose to a full house.

A Full House

If you have a made hand, you need to go all-in!

There will be cases when somebody will call and beat you. But you want to go all-in when you may have the best hand.

This is a full house.

This is a full house.

Anything Stronger Than a Full House

Of course, go all-in if you have four of a kind or a straight flush!

This is four of a kind.

This is four of a kind.

This is a straight flush.

This is a straight flush.

© 2020 Eric Farmer