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"Wargame: Red Dragon": What's the Best 30% Availability Nation?

Ryan Thomas enjoys playing "Wargame: Red Dragon" as his main strategy game, particularly as France and Czechoslovakia.

wargame-red-dragon-whats-the-best-30-availability-nation

Minor nations in Wargame: Red Dragon, are almost universally considered as being unsuitable for top-level play. They can make for valued parts of a coalition, such as Czechoslovakia with Yugoslavia for Entente, but otherwise are mostly undervalued compared to the most competitive factions, Baltic Front, Israel, the USSR, and even in Entente it is decisively Yugoslavia which makes up most of the combat potential. But while they might not be as suitable for the top-ranked games, minor nations can still be fun, and even sometimes viable independent decks to play - and the sweet spot for them is often the 30% availability bonus minor nations.

ANZAC, China, Czechoslovakia, Japan, South Korea, Sweden all have one thing in common in Wargame: Red Dragon, having a 30% availability bonus for their units, meaning they can deploy 30% more units than a nation or deck without any availability boost - and for cards with just 2 units, such as aircraft or some high-level tanks, they can deploy up to 3. This means that they get a massively outsized buff for elite units, such as their superheavies, aircraft, and artillery, and the units that they do deploy can generally be upvetted without sacrificing unit numbers too much. These two features help to make up for minor nations often lacking in capabilities compared to the more powerful nations, and gives them their own unique and interesting playstyle.

Thus, I adapted the same metric I used for judging Australia, with some updates: find out which nations are missing which category of unit. This is somewhat subjective, since what one considers to be, let us say, an effective 5 point infantry transport can be questionable - some are clearly bad, such as the Soviet MT-LBV with bad armor, inadequate weaponry, and only mediocre speed, and the gold standard is clearly the 2-3 armor, multiple machine gun, good speed vehicles like the French AMX-13 VTT, Israeli Zelda (probably the best in the game due to 3 machine guns, admittedly mediocre speed, and 2 armor), M113A3, KM200 - but what about vehicles like the Bardelas which get 3 machine guns but only 1 armor, or the OT-62A with only a small machine gun, mediocre speed, and 1 side armor, but 2 front armor? Furthermore, some categories are not worth nearly as much as others: an exceptional optics unit, for example, is worth significantly less than a good medium tank. Or what about ATGM planes? If one listed just ATGM planes, then Finland's tiny little CM.170 would fulfill the role just as the Super Galeb does for Yugoslavia—but there is a world of difference between a 60 point, x2 20 AP, 35% accuracy MCLOS missiles on 0% ECM platform that goes 600 kilometers per hour compared to Yugoslavia's 900 kilometers per hour, 30% ECM, x2 30 AP, 60% accuracy, fire and forget Super Galeb! One can get around this somewhat by specifying "decent" or "effective," but again this all relies on personal subjectivity. These are ambiguous and subjective questions, but they at least help to establish a general framework.

wargame-red-dragon-whats-the-best-30-availability-nation

ANZAC

  • What's the Worst Faction in Wargame: Red Dragon?
    Finding the worst faction in a game as complex and multi-faced as Wargame: Red Dragon can be subjective, but it probably is ANZAC/Australia due to their limited anti-tank firepower and inflexibility.
wargame-red-dragon-whats-the-best-30-availability-nation

China

wargame-red-dragon-whats-the-best-30-availability-nation

Czechoslovakia

wargame-red-dragon-whats-the-best-30-availability-nation

Japan

wargame-red-dragon-whats-the-best-30-availability-nation

South Korea

  • "Wargame: Red Dragon": How to Play as South Korea
    South Korea's combination of excellent grinding infantry, medium tanks, fire support, and a cost efficient air force makes it into a very good forest fighting and close terrain nation, but it has trouble contesting open ground and lacks special tools
wargame-red-dragon-whats-the-best-30-availability-nation

Sweden

ANZACChinaCzechoslovakiaJapanSouth KoreaSweden

2-armor CV

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Small supply truck (15-20 points)

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Large supply truck (30-40 points)

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

No

Reservists

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

10 point efficient line inantry

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

10 man shock infantry

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Commandos

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Fire support infantry

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

ATGM infantry

Yes*

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Good MANPAD

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Mortar

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Base 7 HE artillery

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

10 second aim time FCS artillery

No

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

10 HE SPG

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

HE MRLS

No

Yes

No

Yes*

Yes

No

Cluster MRLS

No

Yes*

Yes*

No

No

No

2,800 + infrared anti-helicopter AA

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

Radar anti-aircraft missiles

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

SPAAG

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cheap fire support tank

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Workhorse medium tank

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Heavy tank

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Superheavy

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Line reconnaissance infantry

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

No

Shock reconnaissance infantry

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Commando recon infantry

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Sniper team

No

No

No

No

No

No

Excellent optics recon unit

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

(decent) Wheeled fighting reconnaissance vehicle

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

(decent) Tracked fighting reconnaissance vehicle

No

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

(decent) Reconnaissance tank

No

Yes

No

No

Yes

No

Fighting reconnaissance helicopter

No

No

No

Yes

No

No

(decent) Cheap fire support vehicles (35 points and below)

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Effective 5 point infantry transport

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

Effective 10 point wheeled infantry transport

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Wheeled IFV

No

Yes

No

No

No

No

Fire support rockets transport helicopter

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

IFV

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

High AP ATGM armed tank destroyer

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

Fire support helicopter

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Anti-aircraft helicopter

No

Yes

No

Yes*

No

No

Acceptable workhorse fighter

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Anti-helicopter plane

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Superfighter

No

No

No

No

No

No

Iron bomber

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

ATGM plane

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Rocket pod plane

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

SEAD plane

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

Napalm bomb

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Laser guided bomb plane

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

Missing Categories

  • ANZAC: 31
  • China: 14
  • Czechoslovakia: 16
  • Japan: 23
  • South Korea: 15
  • Sweden: 25

One can clearly see that there are, roughly speaking, three tiers—China, Czechoslovakia, and South Korea falling into the first tier, with a relatively complete lineup and a relatively small number of gaps, Japan and Sweden having more, and Australia as the outlier, having the most gaps. Of course, some of these nations have more gaps than they would seem on the surface due to lower quality units in some roles, but I think that it roughly covers them. China, Czechoslovakia, and South Korea are the best bet that one has—the other three tend to lack too much.

Operational Limitations

There are, roughly speaking, three environmental zones and two time zones that have to be dealt with in Wargame, leaving aside air combat—which while vital, in Wargame only exists as a tool to support ground troops. These are open terrain, forests, and cities, and the time zones are the opener and the rest of the game.

Open fields have no cover except for whatever smoke mortar produces, and is dominated by heavy armor: infantry exists only to soak up shells for the most part, while medium tanks are only used if clever smoke usage can enable them to close the field with enemy tanks. ATGMs are useful here if there is scattered cover to deploy them or if one has long-range ATGM units, but they can be easily defeated by extensive smoke micro. Aircraft tend to have devastating effects, particularly ATGM planes, requiring very careful usage of smoke to shield units.

Forest fighting is much more amenable to infantry, since they no longer suffer from a range disadvantage as vision mechanics means that the enemy is always within weapon range when spotted, and they receive an HP bonus when in forests. This doesn't mean that tanks are useless however, vehicles, even poorly armored ones, when properly micro-managed, can be moved up to support the infantry when the enemy is already engaged, when they won't automatically fire their AT weapons. Heavily armored medium tanks or fire support vehicles (such as the BMPT or BTR-T) are even more useful, and medium tanks enjoy a decisive advantage over superheavy tanks, since at close range AP scaling means that they are much more cost-effective than superheavies. Bombers and artillery play important roles since it is hard to move quickly in forests.

Urban fighting is where infantry alone predominates. Although vehicles make for useful fire support platforms, vehicles cannot hope to enter cities since infantry in Wargame can jump from building block to building block, and fire their AT weaponry into their sides or rear. This ability to jump from building to building also diminishes the usage of planes and artillery, although they are still useful.

Time-wise, every Wargame match inherently has some sort of opener - the point when units initially come into contact, when the initial fighting for important points happens, and terrain is secured. Openers prioritize fast, mobile, units, who can get there first with the most firepower, meaning This is what makes Eurocorps for example, one of the best motorized openers in the game, since it has excellent motorized transports such as the VAB T20, great motorized AA such as the Crotale, great mortars such as the HS.30, strong reconnaissance helicopters such as the German recon tiger, great reconnaissance, strong fire support helicopters, and above all else the AMX-10 RC and AMX-10 SB, wheeled tanks that make for incredible fire support during the opening. Winning the opener means that you control the map and the enemy has to attack you, giving you a decisive advantage. Motorized decks, and to some extent airborne decks (although these are not meta), are most favored for this.

The rest of the game might be thought of as "the grind." Here, speed is no longer important - it doesn't matter in most cases how long it takes for your units to arrive at the front. What matters is cost efficiency and combat performance. Mechanized decks perform the best for this, since their units do not pay a premium for speed like a motorized deck does, and often are outright better for lower costs than motorized units, aside from speed. Cheap units and numerous numbers, the ability to mass large numbers, massive firepower, these are the crucial things for fighting afterward.

Some of these nations have clear disadvantages for different scenarios. Japan and Australia are both heavily disadvantaged in forest fighting against enemy heavy tanks by the lack of any AP weapon more than 18 AP, making them next to helpless against heavy armor. Other nations have limited high AP forest weapons, with the United States for example only getting a 21 AP weapon as their peak on a fire support team - but the United States has the advantage of tanks with great armor, making them very cost-effective at fighting in forests. Japan and Australia don't.

None of the nations are per se the "best" at open field engagements, which goes to the USSR, Israel, and to some extent the USA, but Japan, Sweden, and Czechoslovakia probably come out the best, since they have superheavy tanks or something approaching that. Sweden's ineffective air defense makes it vulnerable to air attack while its poor SEAD means it has trouble pressing an attack on enemy forces, while its ATGM plane is mediocre. On top of this, its superheavy tank is not quite a superheavy - it only gets 19 armor, making it significantly more vulnerable to enemy AP weapons. It can only be considered mediocre. Japan's superheavy also only gets 20 armor, which is better, but no ATGM plane, and no SEAD. Still, this is definitively the best environment for Japan, with excellent opportunities to use its great reconnaissance options with the Ninja, its super heavy, acceptable air defense, and supporting ATGMs such as the Chu-Mat. Czechoslovakia gets the best-armored superheavy, the Moderna, good long-range fire support options such as the Pram which offers long-ranged HE and ATGM options, an ATGM plane which although it lacks for fire and forget missiles is survivable and generally can kill a superheavy frontally, SEAD, and medium tanks with long ranged gun-fired missiles to support.

China, South Korea, and Australia come out behind. China fares the best, since it gets a decent heavy tank, which while it cannot stand up against superheavies at long ranges, at least can threaten enemy superheavies, a mediocre, if unexceptional, ATGM plane, SEAD, long ranged extremely high AP ATGM options in the form of the WZ-550, and great air defense. It still lacks for a real superheavy and its supporting medium tanks are mediocre. South Korea lacks the exceptional long ranged ATGM options, but it gets a great ATGM plane, a similar heavy tank, a great medium (although really better at forest fighting than open field engagements, requiring very substantial smoke micro), and SEAD. ANZAC is the nation which comes out by far the worst - its heaviest tank is 55 points, it has bad air defense, it has no SEAD, its ATGM plane has great missiles but awful speed, its supporting ATGMs are easily countered by smoke, etc Against a well-coordinated enemy armored attack with superheavies (or even just heavy tanks or mediums), air defense, fighters, and smoke, there is nothing ANZAC can do, and it struggles to counter even a mediocre enemy performance.

Forest fighting is the domain of South Korea above all else, with Czechoslovakia and to some extent China following up. South Korea has excellent, well armored, medium tanks, highly cost effective infantry with some great high AT weapons, excellent fire support vehicles, very good transport options with KM200s being one of the best infantry APCs in the game as well as some very good IFVs, bombers and artillery, and good air defense, particularly against enemy aircraft. A forest fight is a fight which a South Korean player should expect to win. Czechoslovakia as some reasonably cost effective line infantry and it does have access to high AP infantry options, although some of these are not very versatile, some good supporting medium tanks even if these are not as good in this milieu as the South Korea ones, and good bombers and supporting artillery. While it isn't as good as South Korea, it can perform well. China also has some good AP options, which only really struggle frontally when matched up against superheavy tanks, good bombers, air defense, good stunning MRLS artillery, and very cost effective spam infantry. Its tanks however, lack for the combination of armor, cost effectiveness, and rate of fire which would make them good in a forest.

Sweden, ANZAC, and Japan are the losers for forest fights. Sweden gets some very high AP infantry, as well as great artillery options, and some good, but expensive IFVs. These IFVs however are more designed for long-range fights, and the infantry as a whole is not cost-effective. It lacks for bombers, and its supporting tanks are not good at offensive fighting in forests. ANZAC's tanks are useless in forests due to poor armor, its infantry lack any high AT weapons which can discourage enemy heavily armored tanks, its bombers are great for payload but are not survivable, it has no good supporting transports or fire support, it has terribly artillery, and its air defense is shoddy. However, at least its infantry is extremely effective against enemy infantry. Japan gets all of these problems, but its bombers lack for offensive firepower too, and its infantry is not cost effective and good against enemy infantry like ANZAC units are. If one gets caught in a forest fight as Japan, one probably should just surrender.

Urban fighting is the final zone. China, ANZAC, and South Korea probably come out best here: China gets good cheap line infantry, some great anti-infantry special forces options. ANZAC's Commandos '90 are some of the best anti-infantry units in the game, and it too gets Commandos. South Korea's infantry options are somewhat similar to China, but it lacks the same brutally effective anti-infantry commandos.

Czechoslovakia lacks for commando infantry outside of the recon tab, and its shock options tend to be expensive, but it does great cheap, good line infantry and some SMG armed and somewhat cheap Lehka Pehota who can stand their own in city combat. While Japan's special forces are mediocre elsewhere, the base Kutei really do shine in city fighting, due to their SMGs. Unfortunately, the rest of Japan's infantry tab lets them down. Sweden lacks for versatile urban fighting options, since most of its infantry is expensive and is more geared towards AT work.

China, Japan, and ANZAC get the best openers. China has excellent WZ-551 transports, which get an excellent autocannon, high speed, and 2 frontal armor, unique for a 15 point transport. While there is no light infantry, Tanke Shashoue fire support infantry fill this role by provided a medium-range recoilless rifle team with acceptable AT firepower - they can one-shot two armor units - and which are very good at providing immediate supporting fire in the initial melee. Furthermore AA options are excellent against both helicopters and planes and are very fast, there is a good supporting mortar, and there are great reconnaissance tanks. A long ranged, high speed, wheeled, ATGM carrier, the WZ-550, completes the picture.

Japan also gets a 2 frontal armor wheeled transport, but with a grenade launcher, which is not as good. However, it does get a very good Hachi-Nana Shiki wheeled fighting reconnaissance vehicle, with a good autocannon, decent armor, and high speed, which is very good for initial wheeled engagement. Supporting good wheeled anti-helicopter AA, its light infantry, and its mortar can do wonders for an opener. What makes Japan exceptional though is the Ninja, a relatively cheap, good stealth, exceptionally optics reconnaissance helicopter, great for spotting enemy openers, killing their helicopters, and enabling strikes by laser guided bomb planes. This only really works once but it is a very effective initial punishment to the enemy.

ANZAC's strength in the opener hinges on having a good 10 point motorized transport (although unfortunately it is limited card numbers), and particularly the Vickers MK. 11, which gets medium optics, 17 AP, great accuracy, and a stabilizer for 45 points - although unfortunately it lacks sufficient armor for its price, at just 2. Still, this is a very good opening unit, which really only struggles against Baltic Front, and which can match Eurocorps openers. Unfortunately, its supporting AA and the rest of its arsenal is limited.

Czechoslovakia is not far behind ANZAC, with South Korea and Sweden following up. Czechoslovakia's fighting reconnaissance vehicle, the Snezka, is tracked, which harms its initial utility. But it does get good light infantry, and a fast 15 point transport with at least some AP - overpriced, definitely, and one would much prefer Australia's 10 point ASLAV-PC to Czechoslovakia's OT-64s, but useful in a motorized opener. Thankfully, there are also great fire support helicopters with the Mi-17, the OSA-AKM is an excellent combined anti-helicopter, anti-plane piece which only really struggles against the Longbow, and the reconnaissance infantry is very powerful. South Korea gets some strong commando reconnaissance infantry and some wheeled fighting reconnaissance vehicles, but it lacks wheeled IFVs, it doesn't have light infantry, its recoilless rifle fire support team is mediocre, and its AA is tracked which limits its deployment speed. Sweden doesn't get any wheeled fighting reconnaissance vehicles, its 10 point transports are only average, and its mortar burns through ammunition when used for just smoke firing. But it does get a very fast 5 point truck, uniquely available for its light infantry, and these light infantry are good. While it has to be very carefully used in the opener, it isn't outright bad - just probably the worst.

South Korea, Czechoslovakia, and China lead the pack. South Korea has excellent mechanized transports, with the K200 and KAFV 25, which have good firepower, armor, and mobility. Only limited units come in less cost effective wheeled options, and its mechanized tank and infantry grinding strategy matches a long grind. Czechoslovakia has more units who are dependent on being deployed in less cost effective wheeled transports, but gets units like the Vydra II and rocket helicopters which are highly effective throughout the course of the game. China is more limited than Czechoslovakia, but has a great 5 point transport and very strong 15 point transports.

ANZAC, Japan, and Sweden come afterwards. ANZAC's tracked transports are not the best, but then not much with ANZAC is very good to begin with, so it evens out in the wash. Japan's IFV underperforms for the cost, and while ANZAC at least gets good infantry in its mediocre transports, Japan doesn't even get this. Meanwhile, all of Sweden's options for deployment are either more expensive wheeled vehicles, or a bad IFV and an overly expensive IFV.

Synergy and Strategy

The clear loser when it comes to any discussion of what sort of strategy might work to win a game in Wargame, is Australia - which makes for a perfect opening to discuss what one means by strategy and synergy. Australia gets some good strengths, such as excellent shock infantry, the Commandos '90 that are the best anti-infantry shock infantry in the game and well-rounded, the Vickers Mk. 11 which is a very strong opening wheeled unit (if not as good as the French AMX-10s arguably), and the F111-C bomber, as well as a decent ATGM plane. In theory, this gives it a decent opener. However, its supporting arms are slow and it has little ability to respond to enemy helicopters. Once a motorized option happens, the lack of a good high ATGM infantry team, or a better ATGM option than the TOW-2 carriers, means that Australia is completely dependent on the ATGM plane it has to deal with enemy tank attacks - and this is not reliable, definitely not without SEAD. Australia lacks staying power and in a forest fight it will get rolled over by enemy medium and heavy tanks, in open ground rolled over by enemy superheavy tanks, and urban fights generally have too much influence from supporting fire assets to enable it to win them. Australia doesn't have any viable options for victory, since its units do not synergize well.

China gets a great motorized opener, with strong IFV wheeled transports, stealthy reconnaissance tanks (although not wheeled), fast motorized AA, and some good reconnaissance options, With proper usage of smoke to deal with threats like AMX-10 RCs, they can generally be relied upon to seize forward ground. Lack of an ATGM infantry team does handicap them for holding this ground, but Tanke Shashoue are good medium ranged fire support infantry. China relies greatly upon this initial push, and has to use a mixture of ATGM planes, ATGM ground units, and close ranged infantry and medium tanks to efficiently deal with heavy enemy armor, and stunning attacks from MRLS to clear out forests. The lack of superheavies limits them offensively in open terrain in mobile warfare, and the limited cost efficiency of their shock infantry somewhat undermines their infantry capacity. Furthermore they have very bad capabilities for hitting located enemy targets, due to the absence of any good artillery other than their MRLS, although they get a good bomber arm. It takes good map knowledge and skill to use China to carve out an initial strong early advantage and then exploit it, but they generally do have a response to most anything, even if it is unconventional.

Czechoslovakia is the most well-rounded deck. They get a good opener, let down by a mediocre wheeled transport section but with good light infantry, and above all else great incredible rocket pod helicopters, the Mi-17. Strong supporting arms back this up. A Czech player can expect to do reasonably well in the opener, and then use the strong air bombardment wing, good tanks, rocket pod helicopters, IFVs, and Ondava artillery to have heavy firepower. This is a conventional but effective strategy.

Japan has an excellent opener, with the Ninja anti-air and scout helicopter, as well as wheeled fighting reconnaissance units, good light infantry, fast supporting AA, and good ATGMs. After this however, it is only really good in open field engagements with its tanks. Japan has to rely massively on its Ninjas for providing sneaky vision on enemy units, but it lacks the artillery to really make this effective. Worst of all, it is utterly helpless if the map is a forest engagement.

South Korea is the mechanized nation par excellence. Its relatively weak opener is more than made up for by the great options it has during the rest of the battle, with strong and cheap line infantry with great IFVs, and the excellent K1 tank, as a well as a good air tab. South Korea's strategy focuses around a grinding attrition battle where its units trade better, and dominating enemies in forests. Although it is weaker in open terrain fights, the combination of smoke, an excellent ATGM plane, SEAD, artillery, and defensive usage of long range TOW-2s, as well as the K1A1 if one wants a heavy tank, makes it capable of defensive action.

Sweden's acceptable opener can give it a decent forward position, but after this its weaknesses in effective grinding infantry, specialized tanks, and poor air defense will start to show. Sweden does have an incredible support arm though with great artillery, which means that it can use this as its main striking arm, with massive artillery fire. This is not a sure-fire tactic certainly, but at least it gives it some way to fight, albeit one which requires effective usage of reconnaissance and combined arms.

The Winner

With all of this said, Czechoslovakia is the best 30% nation. Common to all of the other nations, it gets a massive boost to its expensive heavy tanks, artillery, and aircraft, but these are all strong categories for Czechoslovakia, meaning it gains extra utility.

  • Czechoslovakia gets a strong opener, due to its good light infantry, decent wheeled transport, excellent supporting arms and fire support helicopters, while its transport options and units still continue to be reasonably cost-effective throughout the battle.
  • Fire support helicopters cannot be underestimated, and Mi-17s come with cheap and highly cost-effective Vydskari, enabling 45 point Mi-17s with assault infantry.
  • The wide range of tanks, including good cheap fire support T-72s, strong T-72M1Ms medium tanks, and the Moderna as a potent and numerous superheavy, make for an excellent armored arm.
  • There are great fire support options with Vydra II IFVs, direct-fire Prams with cheap 2,450-meter range HE guns and missiles, and of course the rocket pod helicopters.
  • It gets good supporting ATGM helicopters in the form of the Mi-35 which is a very well-rounded gunship and anti-tank helicopter.
  • 10 second FCS artillery, while not the best, does enable effective sniping of enemy CVs, FOBs, AA, and artillery.
  • Line infantry is cheap and comes in a good array of transports, plus effective infantry ATGMs.
  • Excellent array of reconnaissance options.
  • Superb air arm with a good workhorse fighter, excellent bomber, SEAD, anti-helicopter plane, and a workable ATGM plane: although the Su-25 lacks for fire and forget missiles, it is survivable, can reliably kill a superheavy in one pass, comes in large numbers, and is very versatile.

Czechoslovakia's only real downsides are the lack of an effective wheeled fighting reconnaissance vehicle, no HE MRLS for stunning, and a 2,800-meter+ anti-helicopter unit. But given that it is after all, a 30% availability bonus nation, this makes for a quite good set of trade-offs in exchange for the strengths.

  • Good logistics and CVs.

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